Tagged: Innovation

Social Media for Learning in Higher Education #SocMedHE15

#SocMedHE15 is the inaugural Social Media for Learning in Higher Education Conference, a one day conference, hosted by Sheffield Hallam University. The conference will debate and examine our use of social media and its impact on the higher education learning landscape. Together, we will develop our understanding of good, sustainable practice by sharing accounts of emerging innovation in the pedagogic use of social media. Further details here can be found on the conference website.

I am delighted to present a paper (due Feb, 2016) titled: Social Media as a Professional Medium: an equilibrium of enthusiasm and protection for student teachers.

This paper explores the use of social media within a blended mode of study. Specifically, it aims to consider the professional use of online social contexts to support teaching and encourage collaboration between learners. It will illustrate some factors intended to protect their digital identities, confidence and online well-being.

The University of Glasgow School of Education recently established a blended learning course at undergraduate level (initial teacher education). It was the overall aim of the course to expose 70 students to an eclectic mix of exciting ideas within education. This was designed to challenge them. Delivered through the virtual learning environment (VLE), students and teaching staff were expected to engage in professional dialogue by blogging and participating in discussion through social networking platforms such as Twitter (see: Hashtag #MEduc14 #MEduc15). The course aims to enable students to demonstrate understanding of the foundational content and values of education and to be able to articulate a personal stance towards the discipline. It aims to enable them to engage with conventional and new modes of communication as well as facilitating personal confidence and collaborative styles of working. As part of their assessment, students must evidence their online collaboration through the production of both verbal and visual media e.g. YouTube, WordPress, Instagram etc.

In creating this culture of online discussion and in encouraging students to use Twitter and to write blogs, the course takes a pragmatic look on the use of social media as a professional medium and seeks to protect the newly created digital identities of the students as they begin their career as school teachers.

The paper draws from an evidence-based approach and presents data captured through the wider evaluation of the course to describe the use of social media in this context from the perspective of both the course tutors and the students. Crucially, it makes a series of suggestions which other educators may wish to consider when encouraging students to create virtual learning networks and digital media for teaching, learning and collaboration.

My conference presentation can be downloaded here: Presentation.

Impact of Digital Technology on Learning and Teaching #digilearnscot

This literature review was commissioned by the Scottish Government to explore how the use of digital technology for learning and teaching can support teachers, parents, children and young people in improving outcomes and achieving these ambitions.

This study is designed to help inform the development of a strategy for digital learning and teaching by providing evidence of how and why digital learning and teaching can benefit learners, teachers and schools. It also aims to identify the conditions that lead to its successful implementation and any differences between primary and secondary settings. In particular it focuses on how digital technologies can support and contribute to five specific educational priorities: raising attainment, tackling inequalities and promoting inclusion, improving transitions into employment, enhancing parental engagement, and improving the efficiency of the education system.

A literature search was undertaken, collecting nearly 1,000 items from academic, governmental and professional sources. These were reviewed to determine their thematic relevance and the strength of the evidence they presented. The most useful were then collated and assessed to:

  • Identify evidence of relationships between digital learning and teaching activities and the expected outputs, outcomes and impacts;
  • Show the relationships that exist between the digital learning and teaching activities and the outputs, outcomes and impacts for different beneficiaries (learners, parents, teachers, and the school); and
  • Identify which outcomes are immediate, medium-term and long-term.The key findings of the research are presented below, separated into the key thematic areas which were examined during the review. In the cases where studies of similar digital equipment, tools and resources have been systematically reviewed or where there is a large body of evidence from different studies which have measured change (from quantitative studies using counterfactuals and testing learners before and after), it is possible to state there is conclusive evidence. In other cases where the evidence base is weaker (mainly qualitative studies drawing on relatively small samples of learners and schools), it is only possible to state that there is indicative evidence or (where few cases) promising evidence.

More effective use of digital teaching to raise attainment happens when teachers are able to identify how digital tools and resources can be used to achieve improved learning outcomes, as well as having knowledge and understanding of the technology. This applies in all schools.

Where learners use digital learning at home as well as school for formal and non-formal learning activities these have positive effects on their attainment. This is due to the extension of their learning time. This is particularly important for secondary age learners.

There is indicative evidence that the use of digital tools and resources can help to reduce gaps in subject attainment when they are effectively implemented. There is promising evidence that the use of digital equipment and resources can help learners with additional support needs to improve their skills and competences in literacy and numeracy.

Teachers’ skills and competences in recognising how to use digital tools and resources and applying them effectively are critical to achieving positive results for learners with additional support needs or who are disdvantaged in other ways.

There is promising evidence that digital tools can, where effectively used, build skills in interactivity and collaboration, critical thinking and leadership for secondary age learners. These are considered to be vital skills by employers. There is promising evidence too that for secondary age learners, digital resources coupled with digital tools can increase knowledge and understanding of career pathways, applying for work, and working environments. These resources can make it easier for employers to provide help and support to learners.

In addition to the skills that teachers require to harness digital tools and resources to build learners’ employability skills, it is evident that they need to be prepared to develop learner-centred learning approaches. Support for learners to access digital equipment outside the classroom is also important.

There is promising evidence that using digital equipment and tools for direct communication with parents can improve learners’ and parents’ cooperation with requests from teachers about attendance, behaviour and support for learning.

Teachers are more likely to do this once they are more competent in using digital equipment and tools, and once schools use digital tools such as virtual learning environments to facilitate communication with parents.

There is promising evidence that teachers’ efficiency can be increased by using digital equipment and resources to prepare for teaching. There is similarly some qualitative evidence that digital tools and resources enable teachers to do their job better in relation to teaching, assessment and their own on-the-job learning and development.

While many studies clearly focus on specific learners in terms of age, settings (primary, secondary, special education) and domestic circumstances, none make any comparisons between the impact of digital technologies on educational priorities for different age groups. As a consequence, it has not been possible to identify any differences in the use and impact of digital technology in primary and secondary school settings. However, it is generally the case that the impacts found apply relatively equally to primary and secondary school learners.

Successful utilisation of digital technology depends not just upon sufficient access to equipment, tools and resources, but also on the availability of sufficient training, and knowledge and support networks for teachers. Providing teachers with this support will allow them to understand the benefits and applications of digital technologies and enable them to use digital technologies effectively.

Full text (sourced here): Scottish Government Publication

Global Education Conference 2015

GEC

Bienvenue! Welcome! 歡迎! Willkommen! Benvenuto! 환영! Seja bem-vindo(a)! Bienvenido!

We are pleased to announce the sixth annual Global Education Conference, a free week-long online event bringing together educators and innovators from around the world, will be held Monday, November 16 through Thursday, November 19, 2015 (November 20th in some time zones).

The entire virtual conference will be held online using the Blackboard Collaborate platform (formerly known as Elluminate/Wimba) with the support of iEARN worldwide as the conference founding sponsor.

The Global Education Conference is a collaborative, inclusive, world-wide community initiative involving students, educators, and organizations at all levels. It is designed to significantly increase opportunities for building education-related connections around the globe while supporting cultural awareness and recognition of diversity. Last year’s conference featured more than 260 general sessions and 35 keynote addresses from all over the world with over 7,500 participants. To attend this year’s conference and to be kept informed of the latest conference news and updates, please 
join this network: http://www.globaleducationconference.com (text source).

#UofG Students to facilitate workshop at the 2015 STTA Conference

The 2015 Scottish Technology Teacher’s Association Annual Conference will be held in Glasgow on Saturday 7th November 2015. The workshop programme will consist of activities based on the new Design & Technology curriculum and N4/5 courses. I am delighted to announce that a group of BTechEd (Hons) students will facilitate a workshop at the conference.

All teachers of craft, design, engineering and technology (including student teachers) are invited to attend.

Planned highlights to include:

  • Conference Keynote Speaker Dr Diane Aston from The Institute of Materials, Minerals & Mining talks materials.
  • Full Exhibition of Educational suppliers of technology equipment & support resources.
  • An opportunity to meet colleagues from throughout Scotland.
  • Prizes awarded to the winners of the TTA Competitions.
  • Workshops detailed below
  • Full hospitality including tea and coffee on arrival and lunch.

Bob Baldie will return to the TTA Conference this year with a special workshop on wood turning with Peter Fordyce.

James Bleach is the creator of JAMBLE D&T Resource website and will be giving a workshop on how to create effective D&T resources.

Scott Hunter has returned following a highly successful workshop at last years conference. This year the focus is Manual Graphics.

Lynsey McNamee follows last year’s success with another workshop for TeachMeet, an opportunity to see what others have been doing and ask questions.

Our Keynote Speaker has also agreed to do a workshop. There was a lot of positive feedback from attendees last year about her amazing Smart Materials session last year and she has kindly agreed to do so again.

Students at The University of Glasgow BTechEd are doing an interesting workshop on Engineering Systems and Robotics and how to effectively use it in the classroom. A great opportunity to meet the new Technology teachers and learn something new.

Following feedback last year about the effective use of Inventor and desktop publishing in the New Graphics courses, Alan Delany will be doing two workshops: one on Inventor and one on the Serif suite.

Further details and booking via: Scottish TTA

Global Collaboration Day #VET

Please see the post below for details. This was sent via the UNESCO-UNEVOC TVET Experts Forum. I decided to share as it may be of interest to some of you.

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to share with you the launch of the Global Collaboration Day. Over the next couple of days, students, classrooms, teachers, administrators, parents and organizations will be either attending and/or hosting events online that are designed to showcase and promote global collaboration. Over 100 groups have designed and planned their own events which we have then organized into a directory and in special calendars to allow these events to be seen in any time zone in the world.

This is a huge worldwide experiment to demonstrate the power of globally-connected learning.

You are encouraged to browse the event directory or the calendar and choose a compelling event to attend!

Here are some important links for you to keep handy:

We have scheduled an event to contribute to this effort:

http://www.globalcollaborationday.org/event-directory/cognitive-skills-enhancement

Warmest regards to All!

Chris Chinien, Ph.D.

President,

Compétences/Skills R&D Inc.

Presentations from The 3rd International Workshop on Curriculum Innovation and Reform

Members of the International Bureau of Education recently participated in the 3rd International Workshop on Curriculum Innovation and Reform: Changing Assessment to Improve Learning Outcomes, organised by the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (Cedefop). The International Workshop drew on lessons from current work conducted by Cedefop and other research and international organisations on the implications of approaches to the design and implementation of curriculum and assessment policies and practices.

I have attached links to some of the event presentations which I found particularly interesting.

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development – Revolutionising the Way We Teach and Learn

Education stands at a historic point in time where the best of what we know about effective teaching is merging with exciting potentials offered by new technologies, tools, and learning designs. The result is a revolutionary new direction for educational practice.

Choose from more than 140 sessions and spend two and a half days exploring how educators around the world are revolutionising learning. Whether your role is in the classroom or systemwide, this is your chance to learn about effective new programs and practices and join with colleagues in advancing a positive agenda for the future.

The Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) will hold a summer conference in St. Louis, United States, from July 1-3, 2012, on Revolutionising the Way We Teach and Learn. Drawing from 150,000 members and an international network of schools, the leading experts on research-based, classroom-proven approaches will lead the conference. They will provide in-depth analyses on 11 topics, including: achieving equity in education, effective teacher supervision and professional development, teaching and technology, and bullying prevention. For more information or to register for the conference, please see the ASCD website link below.

http://www.ascd.org/Default.aspx

 

Evidence Informed Policy and Practice in Education in Europe

The Evidence Informed Policy and Practice in Education in Europe (EIPPEE) is a two-year project which aims to increase the use of evidence to inform decision-making in education policy and practices across Europe. The network also provides a series of free online and face-to-face courses to help people working in education to explore and evaluate practices, using findings from research. For more information and to view the EIPPEE’s first newsletter, please visit their website at http://eippee.com/cms/.